Archive for the ‘chikungunya’ Category

SPECIAL EDITION: How concerned should we be about the mosquito-borne Chikungunya virus?

July 24, 2014

Chikungunya-Mosquito-Virus-Frederick-MDThis just in from Jenny Marder, PBS News Hour:

“Last Thursday On Thursday, federal officials announced that the tropical Chikungunya mosquito-borne disease had been transmitted for the first time within the United States, infecting two Florida residents.

“What’s notable about these cases is that the people affected reported no recent trips to the Caribbean, Africa or Asia, where the painful virus is widespread. Until last week, all cases reported in the continental United States were from people who had recently traveled to endemic areas. Read: Chikungunya-infected mosquitoes are now living, breeding and sucking human blood in the continental United States.

“’This is not good news,’ says Mike Raupp, professor of entomology at the University of Maryland.

“A few facts. The word Chikungunya derives from the Kimakonde language in Southeast Africa. (pronounced CHICKEN-GUY-YAH.) It means contorted, a nod to the stooped-up appearance of people with severe joint pain, one of the main symptoms of the virus, along with fever, muscle pain, headache, fatigue and rash, according to the World Health Organization.

“’Mainly, you’re going to get a fever,’ said Walter Tabachnick of University of Florida’s Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory. “You’re going to feel lousy. With Chikungunya, you’re going to ache. You do not want to get this disease.”

It is seldom fatal. But that fact shouldn’t deter anyone from aggressive mosquito control, stressed Tabachnick, who believes the media has downplayed the danger of the virus.

“No one wants to be a fear monger. No one is saying, ‘We’re all going to die.’ But on the other hand, it does take public awareness and public responsibility to protect themselves. We’ve been very frustrated by the inability to get this message out to the public and nothing seems to take.”

“The virus is primarily transmitted by two types of mosquitoes, the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, also known as the yellow fever and Asian tiger mosquitoes, respectively. Both are invasive to the United States. The yellow fever mosquito arrived in the 1500s; the Asian Tiger more recently, in the 1980s.

“Unlike the West Nile virus, which is transmitted to mosquitoes mostly from birds and only occasionally to humans, Chikungunya is a mosquito-man virus. This means mosquitoes easily and efficiently transmit the virus to humans.

“Transmission of the virus goes like this: A female mosquito bites an infected person. For about seven days, the virus incubates inside the mosquito, multiplying. The warmer the weather, the shorter that incubation period. Eventually, it migrates into the insect’s salivary glands, and as the mosquito feeds on human blood, she spits, transmitting the virus. (Note: only female mosquitoes bite. They need the protein in the blood to grow eggs.)

“These mosquitoes prefer to breed in man-made storage containers: soda cans, birdbaths, rain barrels and garbage can lids. Standing water that collects on tarp-covered boats is a major breeding site in Florida, Tabachnick said. Yellow fever mosquitoes prefer these sites to natural water, like puddles.

“As of July 18, 2014, a total of 436,586 suspected and 5,724 laboratory-confirmed Chikungunya cases had been reported in the Caribbean, Central America, South America and the United States, according to the Pan American Health Organization.

“’This is not a trivial illness,’ Raupp said. “Even though it’s not often lethal. What’s disturbing is we know we have vector-competent mosquitoes who are able to feed off someone who has a virus circulating in their bloodstream and to transmit it to people who have not yet traveled.”

“To prevent breeding, he said, police and clean up your yard. Dump the birdbath twice a week. Dump or monitor other sources of water.

“’The public outcry should be to demand your neighbors to clean up,’ Tabachnick said. “All it takes is one property owner who doesn’t care, and he could be rearing enough mosquitoes to endanger the entire neighborhood.”

Mosquito Squad: 100% Customer Satisfaction and Dr. Prescribed?

July 22, 2014

doctor_frederick_mdRecently we had a customer call us after a visit with her physician. She stated she was suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and her physician mentioned the negative impact RA has on the immune system. Her physician told her she needed to get extra protection from mosquitoes because the diseases they carry could more easily enter her system due to a compromised immune system. Now that chikungunya has made its way into our area, and in Florida mosquitoes are confirmed to have transmitted the disease to humans, protection from mosquitoes is as important as ever. West Nile virus and chikungunya are all related to the Asian tiger mosquito, which unfortunately resides in Maryland and is an all-day biter. When it comes to mosquito control we have heard a lot of complaining about the irritating bites and the protection of kids and pets, but it was definitely new to be Dr. prescribed, so to speak.

How Mosquito Control in Frederick MD Can Spare You and Your Family from the Chikungunya Virus

June 17, 2014

asian tiger mosquito control in frederick marylandThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is monitoring several states for the Chikungunya virus, including Maryland. Due to an above average rainfall (25% higher than average), the potential for the spread of the virus has dramatically increased. Accompanying this statistic is the fact that people travel more, and in turn are exposed to foreign vector-borne illnesses which they then bring back with them. It’s a perfect storm once someone infected with Chikungunya arrives back stateside; they are the carrier, and the Asian tiger mosquito is the transmitter. Neither Chikungunya nor the Asian mosquito are native, however, due to the rapid increases in industrial globalization and travel, they are now both present in the U.S.

mosquito control in frederick marylandMosquito control in Frederick MD is a serious issue, and Mosquito Squad is the first commercial service to tackle this issue for people who were previously unable to get help. According to the (CDC), “Two species of mosquitoes, aedes albopictus and aedes aegypti, carry the disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the albopictus, commonly known as the Asian tiger mosquito, is more likely to play a larger role in transmission in the United States due to its wide distribution.” Unfortunately, we have the invasive bloodsucker known as the Asian tiger mosquito in Maryland and Mosquito Squad is fighting back. The sheer relief people experience after seeing the results of our barrier spray is astounding. People are actually able to enjoy their backyards without being constantly hounded by mosquitoes. Simply being able to walk into their own backyard without applying bug spray, or having to set up a perimeter of citronella candles is literally life-altering for our customers.

mosquito control frederick mdThere are several methods you can use to prevent mosquito breeding in your yard, one of the most simple and helpful methods is to follow the 5 “T’s”.

1. TIP
Tip anything around your home that can collect water from rain or your sprinkler system. Dog bowls, plant saucers, clogged gutters and kid’s toys left out in the yard can collect enough water to be a perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes.

2. TOSS
Remove excess grass, weeds from gardens, leaves, firewood and other leftover clippings from yards.

3. TURN
Turn over larger yard items that could hold water like baby pools, children’s portable sandboxes or plastic toys.

4. REMOVE TARPS
If tarps stretched over firewood piles, grills or boats aren’t taut, they’re holding water.

5. TREAT
Call Mosquito Squad of Frederick. Our mosquito elimination barrier treatment eliminates up to 90% of the mosquitoes on your property. Remember that mosquitoes are more than just a nuisance; they can carry dangerous diseases such as West Nile virus and the Chikungunya virus.

The most important of all these is to Treat your yard. It’s been helping hundreds of people and will continue to do so. If you would like to take your yard back, give us a call today at (301) 263-7220 or email us at frederick@mosquitosquad.com.