Archive for the ‘tick population frederick md’ Category

Elet Hall’s Further Success on American Ninja Warrior After a Long Battle with Lyme Disease

September 14, 2014

Congratulations to Smithsburg local Elet Hall, who has been recovering from chronic Lyme disease for several years. He was one of only two contestants to finish Stage 2 in the Las Vegas Finals shown on NBD on September 8, 2014. Even with Lyme disease causing him to be not 100% (according to his Facebook page), he finished the seemingly impossible Stage 2 course faster than the other finalist, Joe Moravsky. It is amazing to think that Elet Hall has been able to compete at all when you read about how this disease has impacted him in his daily life. According to an August 12, 2014 post on his Facebook page, he reports:

“While stretching one night I rested my neck on my foam roller and under light pressure I was able to feel a tingle in my face! It could move ever so slightly. After nearly 2 months I could finally get a tiny response. Over the next 2 weeks use of the left half of my face slowly returned to about 80%.

This was last year and I wish the overt symptoms were the worst I experienced. My memory is shot, I lack energy, and I walk around in a fog. My endurance and muscular recovery, which at this point in my training should not plague me, are regularly an issue. It often takes me 3 days to recover from 1 day of training, both mentally and physically. If I have a particularly exciting day I can expect to feel beat down, depressed and uncoordinated the next, a challenging outlook for an athlete.”

When we hear about the paralysis and other symptoms he describes, we are reminded why we are so passionate about killing the deer ticks that spread it. It’s one of the reasons we wanted to get into the outdoor pest control business in the first place. We wanted to help spare people from the horrors he describes. Oddly, everybody’s symptoms can be different. Some doctors have reportedly told people they had Fibromyalgia or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome when it was really Lyme. We can’t even imagine attempting that Stage 2 course with any of those conditions. Some same champions compete even when injured. Elet Hall has shown he has the heart of a champion.

If you watched the finals you may have noticed that Brian Arnold, the American who has gone the furthest on Stage 3 of the finals course leading to Mount Midoriyama, purposefully waited until the last second to push the buzzer when he finished Stage 1. Arnold’s strategy was to complete Stage 2 early enough to allow his body to rest before attempting Stage 3. Meanwhile, Elet Hall ran through Stage 1 seconds faster than everybody else. The result: Arnold was second to run in Stage 2. Arnold admitted that was a mistake as it did not give him time to study other contestants’ difficulty with the dangling ropes obstacle. On the opposite end of the spectrum, Elet Hall was the final contestant to run Stage 2. Then, surprisingly, Elet Hall had to go first on Stage 3, giving him no time to rest after he had just completed the grueling Stage 2. Meanwhile, Joe Moravsky was closer to the middle of the pack and had more time to rest before Stage 3. Moravsky made it further on Stage 3 than Hall. Perhaps if Elet Hall had not been battling Lyme over the past few years he would have completed Stage 2 in prior years and picked a strategy closer to the Moravsky strategy; give yourself time to watch others attempt the course and to rest after you finish Stage 2.

If you visit Elet Hall’s Facebook Page, he also offers his tips for managing his chronic Lyme disease.

“My essentials for continuing to progress as an Lyme athlete:
1. Proper hydration to stave off muscle cramps and numbness/tingling in my fingers and toes when I become acutely dehydrated. I drink a gallon of water a day.
2. Eating clean. I don’t follow a specific diet plan but in order to reduce inflammation it’s important to keep track of what foods help you manage it. I eat mostly fruits and veggies, rice and beans, chicken, and eggs. Dairy doesn’t affect my inflammation but refined sugar and red meat do.
3. Sleep! Get enough! how much is up to you (sic). If at all possible I try to take a quick nap before 1 pm. I feel almost like my old self in the few hours following this. It’s so important to get enough sleep to help our overtaxed CNS to recover.
4. Supplementation- I use a lot of supplements and to what Ive (sic) found is a good effect. I’ve looked over the studies regarding most of them and experimented personally to find what does and doesn’t work for me.”

Elet would often practice in Frederick, Maryland’s Baker Park. Congratulations again Elet, and we hope to see you training in Baker Park and the gorgeous mountain ranges near your home.

Which Annoys You More: Asian tiger mosquitoes, ticks, or stinkbugs?

September 9, 2014

Chikungunya-Mosquito-Virus-Frederick-MDThe Frederick News-Post recently conducted an on-line poll asking which pest is more annoying. Since it was August, they chose to find out if their readers thought cicadas or stink bugs were worse. How curious, we thought. The surprising result was that only 71.6% said stink bugs were more annoying. It would have been more, but 24% said they were equally annoying. Judging by the calls we get from people anxious to get rid of stink bugs, which have been labeled by government officials as the “perfect pest” because they can annoy year round by invading your house in the fall, coming into your home and annoying you all winter, and then coming out again in the spring to hang out on the outside of your house (and start breeding), and then eat the farmers’ crops in the summer. The 29.6% who did not say stink bugs hands down must live in the parts of town where they hardly ever see stink bugs.

brown_marmorated_stink_bug_frederick_marylandIf we were to conduct a poll, we would ask which is more annoying, stink bugs or Asian tiger mosquitoes? The answer would vary by the location of the homeowner. Some might say they are equally annoying because they can’t be in their yard for five minutes without getting eating alive and at the same time have thousands of stink bugs trying to move into their house. But to us, that would be a much more interesting question. Of course, we don’t want to forget the other serious pest control issue in our region: the deer tick, which has infected thousands of people with debilitating bouts of Lyme disease.

lonestar tick in frederick marylandWe at Mosquito Squad of Frederick dislike them all equally. Even one mosquito, tick or stink bug can make our skin crawl; that’s why we love killing them. With stink bugs destroying crops, Asian tiger mosquitoes transmitting West Nile and Chikungunya, and deer ticks transmitting Lyme disease, we can certainly find reasons to enjoy helping people get peace of mind knowing that they don’t have to put up with those pests. Our barrier spray will take care of all of them. After a barrier spray, there will be no more annoying Asian tiger mosquitoes, deer ticks or stink bugs in your yard to annoy you.

As if We Needed Another Reason to Hate Ticks

August 28, 2014

lonestar tick in frederick marylandIf you’re reading this, and have yet to have read it anywhere else, then you are about to read the most disturbing piece of information regarding ticks that we’ve ever heard of. Sure, Lyme disease can cause neurological problems and even kill you and the same goes for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever; but nothing so heinous has ever been conceived until now. It appears the Lone Star tick is capable of causing allergic reactions to red meat.

lonestar tick causes meat allergy in frederick mdIt’s amazing that a bug can turn you into a vegetarian, or at least make you swear off red meat. According to a recent article, “Doctors across the nation are seeing a surge of sudden meat allergies in people bitten by a certain kind of tick”. So there’s an uptick, no pun intended, across the country in meat allergies attributed to the Lone Star tick, fantastic. According to the same article, “Here’s how it happens: The bugs harbor a sugar that humans don’t have, called alpha-gal. The sugar is also is found in red meat — beef, pork, venison, rabbit — and even some dairy products. It’s usually fine when people encounter it through food that gets digested. But a tick bite triggers an immune system response, and in that high-alert state, the body perceives the sugar the tick transmitted to the victim’s bloodstream and skin as a foreign substance, and makes antibodies to it. That sets the stage for an allergic reaction the next time the person eats red meat and encounters the sugar”. This sounds boring and we need to know what happens to people specifically after they enjoy a nice plate of BBQ if they have acquired this allergy. Well, here’s what happens: “In Mount Juliet near Nashville, Tennessee, 71-year-old Georgette Simmons went to a steakhouse on June 1 for a friend’s birthday and had a steak. About 4:30 in the morning I woke up and my body was on fire. I was itching all over and I broke out in hives. Nothing like that had ever happened to me before, she said. A few weeks later, for a brother’s birthday, she ordered another steak. Hours later she woke “almost hysterical” with a constricted throat in addition to hives and a burning sensation”. We like to enjoy our red meat without requiring a visit to the emergency room every time we eat it. Even more so, we don’t want to require an Epipen on our person if we are even exposed to red meat.

tick control frederick mdMosquito Squad of Frederick loves our barbecues, as we’re sure many of you do also. We will ensure that your yard is free of all ticks and make sure that Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and of course vegetarianism do not befall you, or anyone in your family. There’s no need to risk going into anaphylactic shock because you just ate a wonderful fillet. If you have any questions regarding the Lone Star tick and this horrifying new revelation as to what it is capable of, give us a call at (301) 263 – 7220 or email us at frederick@mosquitosquad.com. We will allow for you to both enjoy your cookout free of mosquitoes, but also free of worry about having an allergic reaction to a hamburger.

Tufts University Scientists Warn of a “Tick Boom” This Summer

July 3, 2014

nymph tick in frederick marylandWSET news published on June 23, 2014 an article discussing a stern warning from Tufts University scientists about the potential for a “tick boom” this summer. The jump in the tick population is attributed to abundant snow and a wet spring, which created ideal conditions for this tick boom. According to Tuft’s Professor Sam Telford, “the large amounts of snow this winter acts like a blanket to protect ticks. Plus the wet spring kept ticks from drying out.” The most concerning aspect of the impending tick boom is that it especially applies to the type of ticks that carry Lyme Disease.

frederick maryland tick controlAccording to another article, “June and July are the peak season for the tiny, hard to see nymph ticks which are believed to be the main vector for transmitting Lyme Disease”. The larger issue with the nymph tick is the size of the bug itself. The nymph tick can be especially hard to locate and it is possible to have a nymph tick on your body the size of a comma and, therefore, overlooked as being a freckle, or speck of dirt. Because of this, it is very important to check your body daily. With the expected explosion in the tick population imminent, protecting yourself from ticks should be the primary concern.

There’s nothing like a tick boom to inevitably lead to an uptick in Lyme disease. Adding to the difficulty on reporting the statistical analysis of Lyme Disease, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention believes that “only 10% of the people infected with Lyme disease are accurately diagnosed”. In Maryland in 2013 there were 1,194 cases of Lyme Disease reported, however, the CDC estimates actual cases in Maryland were approximately 11,000. The need for tick control is higher now more than ever. According to the Centers for Disease Control homeowners should “Consider using a professional pesticide company to apply pesticides at your home” to protect from ticks in your yard. If you have any questions or concerns related to tick control and how to protect you and your family from ticks, give Mosquito Squad of Frederick a call at (301) 263-7220 or email us at Frederick@mosquitosquad.com.